Waste Management

Every farmer will be faced with difficulties of removing old litter from poultry houses.The volume of manure produced annually for each functional poultry house can be substantial. It is a good rule of thumb to consider that 0.5 pound of litter is produced from every pound of meat produced.

Farms could generate large tonnage of manure/year. The clean-out time may occur during the seasons when litter is not needed for crop growth. As a result, the poultry grower should have an adequate storage facility for the litter until the planting seasons.

Several litter-storing methods are available, but the method of choice depends upon length of storage, quantity of litter produced and input cost. Covered stockpile, stockpile with ground liner, and roofed storage structure are the three basic alternatives for litter storage.

The primary goals of storing poultry litter are to prevent nutrient runoff and leaching and to minimize insect and odor problems. Estimate the amount of litter produced annually so you can calculate litter storage requirements to determine facility costs.
Once these have been estimated, the farmer can determine which method of storage is best for his/her operation.

Total flock mortality typically ranges from 5 to 12 percent, and it can vary due to factors such as bird age, bird health, ventilation and season of the year. Farmers must implement a disposal method that is environmentally friendly while also being cost effective. Bird disposal methods currently used are burial pits, incineration and composting. Burial pit is the preferred choice because it is the most economical. There are advantages for some of the other methods. Incineration is probably the safest biological method, and composting results in a useable end-product for fertilizer.

Lastly, poultry waste must be disposed and stored in such a way that it’ll not contaminate the water source or else it will result into water contamination which poses threats to the welfare of the animals.

Share

admin

Agrospan is targeted towards impacting knowledge to farmers for sustainable food security. The blog is owned by Shola Oyenniran, an agriculturist who has managed various agricultural investments.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *